11,444 notes • 11:45 PM
" Have you ever looked at your body without the lens of your colonized mind? "
by Key Ballah, Unlearn (via keywrites)

(via patriciachillcollins)

lecapunk:

precarioussanity:

thatcorbincrow:

can there please be some kind of online exchange where trans boys can give their old clothes to trans girls and vice versa? does that exist? if not am i allowed to start one because holy wow that would be the bomb diggety

can this happen

THERE IS ACTUALLY A BLOG FOR THIS NOW

and cis people can also donate clothes, because that gives people a bigger pool to get clothes from and it’s one of the ways that we can be active allies for our trans siblings

(via hemelbeestje)

" Ableism must be included in our analysis of oppression and in our conversations about violence, responses to violence and ending violence. Ableism cuts across all of our movements because ableism dictates how bodies should function against a mythical norm—an able-bodied standard of white supremacy, heterosexism, sexism, economic exploitation, moral/religious beliefs, age and ability. Ableism set the stage for queer and trans people to be institutionalized as mentally disabled; for communities of color to be understood as less capable, smart and intelligent, therefore “naturally” fit for slave labor; for women’s bodies to be used to produce children, when, where and how men needed them; for people with disabilities to be seen as “disposable” in a capitalist and exploitative culture because we are not seen as “productive;” for immigrants to be thought of as a “disease” that we must “cure” because it is “weakening” our country; for violence, cycles of poverty, lack of resources and war to be used as systematic tools to construct disability in communities and entire countries. "
by Mia Mingus, “Moving Toward the Ugly: A Politic Beyond Desirability” (via fashinpirate)

(Source: ethiopienne, via thingsofthespirit)

" Statistically, a woman is more likely to be hurt by a man than she is to ever be eaten by a shark, hit by a car, be attacked by a bear, crash in a plane, or be bitten by a spider. When a woman expresses fear of any of these events, she is still seen as a rational person. When I tell people that I am afraid of swimming in the ocean because I’m afraid of sharks, they accept it almost without question. But, when I tell people that I’m afraid of men, that men scare me more than sharks and spiders and freak plane accidents all combined, I immediately lose their respect. I am considered elitist. I am considered sub-human. "
by A Benediction For My Daughter (via rococoswagbitch)

(Source: oeua, via zebufur)

8,009 notes • 5:53 PM
"

Beauty privilege is very real. None of us are imagining it, and if we aren’t born genetic lottery winners, our only option is to compensate with style, grace, and charm. Of course, none of that shit comes cheap. That’s kind of the whole point. It’s all meant to be aspirational and exclusionary. We’re supposed to feel depressed by our skin, agitated by our bodies, and anxious about our invisibility. That’s the insidious subtlety of social control.

The worst part is that we know in our rational minds that it’s all bullshit, and yet we’re still plagued with self-loathing when we can’t live up to unattainable beauty standards. No matter how much self-acceptance we achieve, we can still look in the mirror and instantly catalog all the things about ourselves that we don’t think measure up. It’s maddening. It makes us feel like hypocrites even though it’s not our hypocrisy.

"
by

The Coquette @ Adult-Mag (via salemcats)

good reminders~~WE ARE ALL BEAUTIFUL

(via girlsgetbusyzine)

8 notes • 6:15 PM